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Voted: Most Trusted UK Theatre Critic 2018

Lyn Gardner

New tips and reviews every week. If you're looking for innovative theatre, you've come to the right place.
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Each week, Lyn shares her theatre tips exclusively on the Stagedoor app. This is a mix of upcoming theatre she’s excited about and shows that are currently playing that she knows are great. Download the app now to check them out!
Article icon Reviews & Articles
You can read Lyn’s full-length reviews here on our website but if you use the app you can also follow all the brilliant theatre makers you discover through Lyn’s writing. The next time they have a show on in London, it will be at the top of the personalised recommendations.

Articles by Lyn Gardner

Review: Hive City Legacy by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Hive City Legacy
I still recall the pleasure of stumbling across Hot Brown Honey at the Edinburgh fringe in 2016.
Review: Games for Lovers by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Games for Lovers
Enough to make you want to swear to celibacy and become a hermit, Games for Lovers is an exhausting four-hander about a group of millennials in search of love.
Review: The Night of The Iguana by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: The Night of The Iguana
With the iguana—destined for the cooking pot—desperately scratching away under the veranda, it’s a long old night for the troubled residents of the rackety Costa Verde hotel on the West Coast of Mexico in 1940.
Review: Whitewash by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Whitewash
When Mary’s son, Lysander, was a baby, policemen in the street would look at her strangely, perhaps suspecting her of kidnapping. That’s because while she was black, Lysander was white as “a pearl.”
Review: Lunatic 19’s - A Deportational Road Trip by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Lunatic 19’s - A Deportational Road Trip
The title may be lumpy, and sometimes the plotting is too, but Lunatic 19’s: A Deportational Road Trip (Finborough) is a steely first play with a tender heart.
Review: Jellyfish by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Jellyfish
Kelly is 27 and never been kissed. But then she meets geeky, gentle Neil who works in the arcades on the Skegness seafront she so loves.
Review: Peter Gynt by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Peter Gynt
Punishingly long –and yet oddly sketchy– David Hare’s updated version of Ibsen’s 1867 poetic drama Peer Gynt (NT, Olivier) stars James McArdle as Peter, the serial fantasist who becomes trapped by his own fabulations and a fatal lack of self-knowledge.
Review: seven methods of killing kylie jenner by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: seven methods of killing kylie jenner
OMG. How do you put the internet on stage?
Review:  The End of History by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: The End of History
The End of History at the Royal Court reunites director John Tiffany and playwright Jack Thorne who worked together on Harry Potter and the Cursed Child.
Review: Aesop's Fables by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Aesop's Fables
You couldn’t hope for a more exciting line-up of contemporary playwrights than those assembled by the Unicorn for these modern takes on Aesop’s Fables.
Review: Europe by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Europe
In the waiting room of a station where the trains no longer stop, situated in a dying town somewhere in the middle Europe, Katia (Natalia Tena) and her father Sava (Kevork Malikyan) sit and wait.
Review: Othello: Remixed by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Othello: Remixed
Everyone knows that it must be serious because Othello has been spotted in Nandos with Desi. And you don’t take a girl to Nando’s unless you are “banging her.”
Review: The Hunt by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: The Hunt
When six-year-old Clara (Taya Tower) gives her kindergarten teacher, Lucas (Tobias Menzies), a heart-shaped lollipop and he rejects the gift she accuses him of inappropriate touching.
Review: Present Laughter by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Present Laughter
When we first glimpse Andrew Scott’s self-obsessed actor Garry Essendine in this revelatory revival of Present Laughter (Old Vic) he is dressed like a dishevelled Captain Hook. His one-night stand, the love-struck Daphne (Kitty Archer) is sporting fairy wings, a mascara-stained Tinkerbell.
Review: Summer Rolls by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Summer Rolls
Mai’s parents fled Vietnam after the war ended and her father (Kwong Loke) was released from a re-education camp run by the Communist government. They joined their son, Anh (Michael Phong Le), who had been sent on ahead as an 11-year-old and who was settled in England.
Review: Citysong by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Citysong
If you have been lucky enough to catch the work of Irish company Malaprop—and you still can because 'Everything not Saved' is at New Diorama next week as part of the excellent Incoming Festival—you will be familiar with the pellucid writing of Dylan Coburn Gray.
Review: Strange Fruit by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Strange Fruit
Handing on the baton is crucial to the artistic health and vibrancy of British theatre.
Review: The Future by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: The Future
I have seen the future and its not quite working. At least Little Bulb’s version of it isn’t. Or not yet it isn’t.
Review: Woke by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Woke
Music is woven through Apphia Campbell’s 'Woke' (BAC) like a river. The river is made from the gospel songs of slaves, the blues of Bessie Smith and others, but also from the blood of those who came before, whose names are lost to history. Do you remember the name of Michael Brown? I didn’t.
Review: Afterglow by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Afterglow
For a play which is so blatantly full frontal, Afterglow (Southwark Playhouse) is almost entirely unrevealing and emotionally coy.
Review: The Sweet Science of Bruising by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: The Sweet Science of Bruising
The delicious Wilton’s Music Hall in the East End, one of London’s most atmospheric venues, may well have hosted boxing bouts in the 19th century.
Review: Armadillo by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Armadillo
When bad things happen you often armour yourself against the world. Fifteen years ago, while still a teenager, Sam (Michelle Fox) was abducted and held prisoner in her small American hometown where she now lives with her husband John (Mark Quartley).
Review: Bronx Gothic by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Bronx Gothic
Okwui Okpokwasili stands in the corner of the white draped stage and her lower torso shakes. Her legs twitch and jerk incessantly. It is as if her body has been struck by an internal earthquake. It throws a shadow that looms over her.
Review: Anne meets Jeffrey by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Anne meets Jeffrey
You only have until tonight to see Anne meets Jeffrey at Battersea Arts Centre, but you should. Not least because to see is to bear witness.
Review: Rutherford and Son by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Rutherford and Son
There has been some criticism of programming at the NT, and the lack of diverse female voices.
Review: The Lehman Trilogy by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: The Lehman Trilogy
Theatre, of course, is a mirage. It makes you believe in something that doesn’t exist. Money operates in a similar way. Like Father Christmas or the Tooth Fairy it only works if you believe in it. There is nothing holding it up.
Review: Operation Mincemeat by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Operation Mincemeat
10 reasons why you should see SplitLip’s Operation Mincemeat at the New Diorama.
Review: Dead Dog in a Suitcase (and Other Love Songs) by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Dead Dog in a Suitcase (and Other Love Songs)
“That’s the way to do it!” screeches the vicious Mr Punch at the end of Dead Dog in a Suitcase (and Other Love Songs) which arrives at the Lyric Hammersmith as part of a national tour.
Review: Our Town by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Our Town
Despite its reputation as a hoary old warhorse—it's a play that's regularly staged by American high schools—Thornton Wilder’s meta theatre play about small town American comings and goings is rich both in its depiction of everyday life and theatrical possibilities.
Review: Anna by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Anna
East Berlin 1968. In their brand-new flat Anna (Phoebe Fox) and her husband Hans (Paul Bazely) are in high spirits.
Review: White Pearl by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: White Pearl
Vicky Featherstone’s thrilling exploration of what new writing can be continues at the Royal Court with White Pearl.
Review: Rejoicing at Her Wondrous Vulva the Young Woman Applauded Herself by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Rejoicing at Her Wondrous Vulva the Young Woman Applauded Herself
When Bella Heesom’s teenage self loses her virginity without any real pleasure, her Clitoris (Sara Alexander) is not at all happy. “I need to be included. Why didn’t you invite me?” she wails.
Review: Die! Die! Die! Old People Die! by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Die! Die! Die! Old People Die!
You may think that you want to live forever, but you won’t after seeing Die! Die! Die! Old People Die! (Battersea Arts Centre), the latest show from Ridiculusmus.
Review: Death of a Salesman by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Death of a Salesman
It is fascinating what a difference small shifts can make. Turn Bobby into Bobbie and suddenly 'Company' doesn’t seem fusty but a sharply contemporary look at the pressures, both biological and social, faced by modern women.
Review: Bromley Bedlam Bethlehem by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Bromley Bedlam Bethlehem
Eamonn (Dan Mullane) is a storyteller. He claims that he was a foundling discovered in the arms of a statute of the Virgin Mary in the church in the Irish village where he was born.
Review: Avalanche - A Love Story by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Avalanche - A Love Story
“Some kinds of loss are very hard to name,” says the woman on stage at the start of Julia Leigh’s memoir Avalanche which plays the Barbican until next weekend as part of its Fertility Fest.
Reviews: Out of Water & The Amber Trap by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Reviews: Out of Water & The Amber Trap
You can wait a long time to see a play that puts queer women centre stage and then two come along in the same week. It’s clear that theatre and the stories it tells are slowly evolving, just like society itself.
Review: Rosmersholm by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Rosmersholm
What a strange play this is. Written between the Wild Duck and Hedda Gabler, but much more rarely performed than either, Ibsen’s 1886 play Rosmersholm (Duke of York’s) is an odd mixture of political debate and personal anguish.
Review: The Half God of Rainfall by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: The Half God of Rainfall
When Nigerian Modupe is born on the banks of the river she is so beautiful her mother knows she must be protected from men.
Review: All My Sons by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: All My Sons
It’s clear right from the start of Jeremy Herrin’s revival of All My Sons that this is an America in denial.
Review: Mouthpiece by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Mouthpiece
Promising Scottish playwright Libby (Neve McIntosh) moved to London. But now Libby is in her forties, her once auspicious career is on the rocks and she’s back in Edinburgh standing on Salisbury Crags thinking of stepping out into the void.
Review: Funeral Flowers by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Funeral Flowers
In Shakespeare’s Hamlet we last see the doomed Ophelia handing out flowers. These flowers have meaning. Rosemary is for remembrance. Pansies are for thoughts.
Review: Three Sisters by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Three Sisters
Rebecca Frecknall’s staging of Three Sisters at the Almeida begins a year before Chekhov’s play normally begins. It opens with the funeral of the siblings’ father, the late General, who brought them to the provincial Russian garrison town where they are now stranded far from their beloved Moscow.
Review: The Show in Which Hopefully Nothing Happens by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: The Show in Which Hopefully Nothing Happens
Some of my best friends think theatre is boring. There are plenty of nights in the theatre when I think they might have a point. Then I see something brilliant and I fall in love with theatre all over again and leave the theatre giddy with excitement.
Critical disagreements: Admissions by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Critical disagreements: Admissions
Prejudice, privilege and provocation — how Admissions is pressing people's buttons
Review: A Family Outing - 20 Years On by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: A Family Outing - 20 Years On
Twenty years ago, Ursula Martinez made a revelatory show, A Family Outing, in which she unpicked family life, myths and relationships with the help of her mum and dad who appeared alongside her on stage.
Review: Wolfie by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Wolfie
There is a touch of Disco Pigs and something of Blood Brothers about Wolfie at Theatre 503.
Review: Mary's Babies by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Mary's Babies
There is a bit of a VAULT Festival takeover on the London fringe at the moment.
Review: Emilia by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Emilia
“Search for this and you won’t find it,” is one of the refrains of Emilia, Morgan Lloyd Malcolm’s gloriously enjoyable comedy which celebrates the late Elizabethan poet Emilia Bassano.
Review: Downstate by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Downstate
Richard Eyre has talked about the way that theatre creates empathy, arguing that the arts "enable us to put ourselves in the minds, eyes, ears and hearts of other human beings." Bruce Norris' latest play, Downstate, is an exercise in empathy, a test of our humanity.
Review: Frankenstein by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Frankenstein
Naked lightbulbs glow in the haze hanging over the stage in Battersea Arts Centre’s Grand Hall. From out of the shadows emerge sounds like the rumbling of thunder or the rustle of leaves or the coo of doves. Voices soar in lament, tongues click, and the stage shimmers with sound and emotion.
Review: Betrayal by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Betrayal
So, to which Betrayal exactly does the title refer? There are many different kinds of betrayal in Harold Pinter’s 1978 play inspired by his own adulterous relationship with Joan Bakewell.
VAULT Festival Reviews: 10, Lights! Planets! People! & Bite Me by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival Reviews: 10, Lights! Planets! People! & Bite Me
Like last year’s Edinburgh fringe, one of the things that the 2019 Vault Festival has proved is that, while more established theatres are still struggling to tell different and more diverse stories, those at the beginning of their careers are making it look as easy as drinking a glass of water.
VAULT Festival Reviews: Blue Thunder & Lucy Light by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival Reviews: Blue Thunder & Lucy Light
Shows can look and feel very different depending on the seat from which you experience them.
Review: The Ridiculous Darkness by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: The Ridiculous Darkness
Ultimo (Rochelle Rose) is in the dock in a Hamburg court on trial for piracy.
Review: A Hundred Words for Snow by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: A Hundred Words for Snow
In 'A Hundred Words for Snow' at Trafalgar Studios 2, Rory’s geography teacher dad has been planning a trip for him and his teenage daughter to the North Pole.
VAULT Festival Reviews: Pufferfish, Thrown, 3 Billion Seconds & Dangerous Giant Animals by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival Reviews: Pufferfish, Thrown, 3 Billion Seconds & Dangerous Giant Animals
In 'Dangerous Giant Animals' Christina Murdoch plays Claire, the middle and often overlooked sister in an American family.
Review: Medea by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Medea
Bloody hell, Medea at the Barbican is frighteningly good.
Review: Alys, Always by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Alys, Always
If you were Nicholas Hytner and over a 40-year career you had never directed a play by a woman Alys, Always seems a curious place to start.
Review: Inside Bitch by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Inside Bitch
Most of us think that we are experts on what it’s like to be in prison on the basis of having seen a few episodes of Orange is the New Black or Locked Up.
VAULT Festival Reviews: Wood, It’s Not a Sprint & Mara by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival Reviews: Wood, It’s Not a Sprint & Mara
Wood is a smart, funny and seriously thoughtful show created by writer Adam Foster, director Grace Duggan and the cast: George Fletcher, Claire Cartwright, Phillipa Hogg and Nneka Okoye.
VAULT Festival Reviews: Ladykiller, Narcissist in the Mirror & I will still be whole (when you rip me in half) by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival Reviews: Ladykiller, Narcissist in the Mirror & I will still be whole (when you rip me in half)
The maid in the hotel room is up to her elbows in blood. There is a dead body on the floor and a congealing rust-like puddle spreads out from beneath it. There follows a breathless story from the maid about how the hotel guest attacked her and how she killed in self-defence.
Review: The Trick by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: The Trick
The real sleight of mind we perform upon ourselves is the way we live our lives pretending that we are immortal. But we are dying the moment we leave the womb.
Review: Dinomania by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Dinomania
Kandinsky’s Dinomania takes place in a theatre—the New Diorama—but in Joshua Gadsby and Naomi Kuyck-Cohen’s design it also looks as if it might be taking place in a particularly tasteful funeral parlour complete with a pianist (Zac Gvirtzman) performing throughout.
VAULT Festival Reviews: Vespertilio, Digging Deep & Drought by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival Reviews: Vespertilio, Digging Deep & Drought
Barry McStay's Vespertilio couldn't have found a better home than at VAULT Festival. In Lucy Jane Atkinson's nifty production it transports us from the tunnels under Waterloo Station to another railway tunnel deep in the Sussex countryside.
VAULT Festival Reviews: The Apologists & Orlando by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival Reviews: The Apologists & Orlando
Jon Ronson’s 'So, You’ve Been Publicly Shamed' has inspired Molly Taylor’s 'Cacophony', produced by the Almeida Young Company, and which is at the Yard until Saturday.
VAULT Reviews: Call Me Fury & Bottled. by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Reviews: Call Me Fury & Bottled.
There is a power in naming. In Salem during its 17th century witch trials the accused were urged to name others who were also witches. In times of fear naming can be a kind of contagion.
VAULT Festival Reviews: Girls, Everywoman & Jammie Dodger by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival Reviews: Girls, Everywoman & Jammie Dodger
I loved Pappyshow’s Boys at the New Diorama last year, a disarmingly charming and heart-felt physical theatre piece created by a group of young men exploring their individual identities and what it means to be a man.
Review: Binaural Dinner Date by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Binaural Dinner Date
I once read an article suggesting that only a few questions were required to discover if a couple were compatible.
Review: Why you should see Soft Animals at Soho Theatre by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Why you should see Soft Animals at Soho Theatre
Holly Robinson’s play is a debut and it is always thrilling to hear a distinctive new voice and see a first play of such startling assurance.
Vault Festival Reviews: Mancoin & Jericho by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Vault Festival Reviews: Mancoin & Jericho
There are lots of smart shows at the Vault Festival but the conditions seldom lend themselves to work which is also slick. But Saturday night’s viewings brought forward two very neatly put together shows that both know exactly what they are doing and are both smart and slick.
VAULT Festival Reviews: Sexy Lamp, Greyscale & A Wake In Progress by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival Reviews: Sexy Lamp, Greyscale & A Wake In Progress
You all know the Bechdel test, don’t you? It’s a measure of the representation of woman in plays, movies and novels that asks whether the work features two women talking to each other about something other than a man. But do you know about the sexy lamp test?
VAULT Festival Reviews: We’ve Got Each Other, Jade City & The Good Landlord by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival Reviews: We’ve Got Each Other, Jade City & The Good Landlord
“Piece out our imperfections with your thoughts,” says the Chorus at the start of Henry V, adding, “Think when we talk of horses, that you see them/ Printing their proud hoofs i' the receiving earth.
Review: Counting Sheep by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Review: Counting Sheep
Most protest takes the form of theatre, a spectacle that disrupts the status quo. Inspired by their personal experiences of manning the barricades in Kiev's 2014 uprising, Mark and Marichka Marczyk's folk opera harnesses that idea.
VAULT Festival Reviews: Kicking all the Boxes & Womans by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival Reviews: Kicking all the Boxes & Womans
When 15-year-old Cork resident, Naoise, wins the Under -16s European kick boxing championships her future seems assured.
VAULT Festival Reviews: The Darklings, Nikolaos the Wonderworker & Yours Sincerely by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival Reviews: The Darklings, Nikolaos the Wonderworker & Yours Sincerely
To be honest I'm not a great one for horror. The last horror film I saw was the Shining and that finished me off. Comedy? I last had a really good laugh in about 2002.
VAULT Festival Reviews: Astronaut & Fight Night by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival Reviews: Astronaut & Fight Night
When the boy was a child his father used to tell him stories of the Apollo moon landings and how the stars were in reach for all of us. The boy wanted to grow up to be an astronaut but now he is a man—nameless and just a statistic like so many of the homeless.
VAULT Festival Reviews: Salaam, Hear Me Howl & The Noble Nine by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival Reviews: Salaam, Hear Me Howl & The Noble Nine
Rema (Raagni Sharma) and her mother Mariam (Yasmin Wilde) are preparing for Ramadan. Mariam says that the words of the Koran are like music but for Rema they stick like tar in her mouth. She is writing her own words to express how she feels and who she is.
VAULT Festival Reviews: Open, Thomas & Blue Departed by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival Reviews: Open, Thomas & Blue Departed
Christopher Adams and Timothy Allsop are a couple in real-life. They say that they don’t work together because Orton and Halliwell were not the best role models. But in Open they are not just appearing together on stage they are excavating their own life as a couple.
VAULT Festival Reviews: Lola & Kompromat by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival Reviews: Lola & Kompromat
The “teenage temptress” was a stock character of 20th century novels and movies. Her influence extended to the courts with lawyers arguing in rape trials that she led the defendant on because of her voluptuous figure and the way she dressed.
VAULT Reviews: Opal Fruits, Dangerous Lenses and The Pantechnicon by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Reviews: Opal Fruits, Dangerous Lenses and The Pantechnicon
Day 2 of VAULT festival
VAULT Festival Reviews: Inside Voices & Juniper and Jules by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival Reviews: Inside Voices & Juniper and Jules
The VAULT Festival is effectively Edinburgh in London with about the same level of dampness and similar spiralling levels of excitement. It makes theatre an event. It makes it fun.
Homing in: Reviews of The Unreturning & Backup by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Homing in: Reviews of The Unreturning & Backup
"There is no place like home," says Dorothy in the Wizard of Oz. But for the young men coming back from war in The Unreturning (Stratford East), home turns out to be less welcoming than they remember.
Success, lies and videotapes by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Success, lies and videotapes
A woman dressed like Princess Diana on her wedding day sits at a table covered in a Union Jack and eats.
Approaching Empty at the Kiln by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Approaching Empty at the Kiln
Ishy Din's latest play is set in a Northern mini-cab office in the wake of Margaret Thatcher's death.
When aspects of love are unpalatable by Lyn Gardner cover photo
When aspects of love are unpalatable
The 20th century musical is one of the most under-rated art forms, as if its commercial successes and the fact that audiences love it inevitably means that it's artistic creditability is sapped.
Making new writing more Pleasance by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Making new writing more Pleasance
I've always thought it was odd that The Pleasance is such a major player in Edinburgh every fringe, but that its London venue never feels like a significant pin on the theatrical map.
War of the Worlds: the truth about myth-making: by Lyn Gardner cover photo
War of the Worlds: the truth about myth-making:
We all know the story of Orson Welles' 1938 radio broadcast of The War of the Worlds which, with its convincing simulated news bulletins, spread mass panic across the US leaving millions believing that America was being invaded by aliens. Right? Actually, no.
VAULT Festival 2019: the lowdown on Weeks 6-8. by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival 2019: the lowdown on Weeks 6-8.
Here's the final part of my pre-festival guide, featuring the VAULT Festival shows that have caught my eye from weeks 6, 7 & 8.
A few random thoughts about Pinter Five and Six by Lyn Gardner cover photo
A few random thoughts about Pinter Five and Six
I felt slightly doubtful about seeing five Pinter plays—albeit some of them short—in a single day. I reckon that a little Pinter often goes a long way.
Times they are a changing by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Times they are a changing
History and experience tell us that the world shifts on its axis. Regimes crumble, industries disappear, jobs are lost, people die, power is lost or gained, and the regular monthly pay-check suddenly stops coming. The warning signs may be there but we refuse to heed them.
VAULT Festival 2019: the lowdown on Weeks 2-5 by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival 2019: the lowdown on Weeks 2-5
Continuing from last week’s article, here’s my guide to VAULT Festival from weeks 2 to 5. This is a mix of shows I've seen before and enjoyed – and new shows that have caught my eye.
VAULT Festival 2019: the lowdown on Week 1 by Lyn Gardner cover photo
VAULT Festival 2019: the lowdown on Week 1
VAULT Festival begins later this month, and I’m going to be trying to cover as much as I can of the eight-week festival which gives a London platform (albeit a subterranean one) to both emerging and established artists from the UK and abroad.
It’s all child’s play by Lyn Gardner cover photo
It’s all child’s play
If you were to ask me about the great theatre companies of the last 30 years, I’d say that one of the very greatest has been Oily Cart.
The welts left behind by Lyn Gardner cover photo
The welts left behind
“The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there,” begins LP Hartley’s 1953 novel, The Go Between. But as Hartley’s anti-hero discovers we carry the past with us. There is no escaping it.
The Tell-Tale Heart: the eyes have it by Lyn Gardner cover photo
The Tell-Tale Heart: the eyes have it
That Anthony Neilson is a sly one. Smart too. His latest piece, the Tell-Tale Heart at the National Theatre’s Dorfman space, takes Edgar Allan Poe’s creepy 1843 story of madness and murder and gives it a contemporary spin.
Camden People’s Theatre: rackety and radical by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Camden People’s Theatre: rackety and radical
London is bursting to the brim with theatre from the West End to the NT on the South Bank to the boutique venues such as the Donmar to the Almeida.
Home Truths by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Home Truths
In Natasha Gordon’s Nine Night at Trafalgar Studios, Gloria is dead. She came to England on the Windrush, leaving behind her first-born daughter Trudy in Jamaica. Now her clan is gathering for nine days of mourning at her home.
10 things I love about Orpheus at Battersea Arts Centre by Lyn Gardner cover photo
10 things I love about Orpheus at Battersea Arts Centre
1. Like Emma Rice’s Wise Children, Little Bulb’s show within a show is a celebration of theatre itself in all its gaudy down-at-heel red velvet glory and tawdry illusions.
Future past by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Future past
I came late to The Inheritance at the Duke of York’s, only catching up with it on World Aids Day.
Look back in anger by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Look back in anger
Ellie Kendrick’s Hole at the Royal Court Upstairs operates like an all- female cosmic cabaret, and one whose rocket fuel is rage.
Losing the path, finding yourself by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Losing the path, finding yourself
In Sondheim’s Into the Woods, Red Riding Hood tells the Baker that her mother has warned her never to stray from the path. To which he quite rightly points out that it’s already too late because “the path has strayed from you.”
Artful autobiographies: It's my life and I'll lie if I want to. by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Artful autobiographies: It's my life and I'll lie if I want to.
“Nothing I have said is factual except the bits that sound like fiction,” declared Clive James in his Unreliable Memoirs.
The kids are not alright by Lyn Gardner cover photo
The kids are not alright
We can tell from the fact that 4.5 million children live below the breadline, up by a million in less than a decade.
Rendezvous in Bratislava: reclaiming the past by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Rendezvous in Bratislava: reclaiming the past
History is too serious to be left to the historians. Particularly personal histories. But it is these individual stories, the ones that never make it to the history books, which shed the greatest light. Yet so often they remain hidden from view.
Hadestown: Definitely not a love story by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Hadestown: Definitely not a love story
The National has always had better luck with musicals the more off-beat they have been.
New Diorama: inventing the future by Lyn Gardner cover photo
New Diorama: inventing the future
The value of a theatre lies not just in the work it does for itself — effectively, the shows that the team have a yen to produce — but in what it does for everybody else.
It’s grim and getting grimmer by Lyn Gardner cover photo
It’s grim and getting grimmer
The Doomsday Clock stands at two minutes to midnight. Scientists have warned that we have 12 years to avert climate change disaster. But still we sleepwalk towards catastrophe, taking no responsibility. We assume, like children, that the grown-ups—the scientists and the policy-makers—will save us.
All the dead voices: how are we remembering the Great War 100 years on? by Lyn Gardner cover photo
All the dead voices: how are we remembering the Great War 100 years on?
In Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, Estragon and Vladimir talk about “all the dead voices” which they hear. The dead, they say, make a noise like wings, like leaves, like sand.
Babies on stage: we shouldn’t coo, but we do. by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Babies on stage: we shouldn’t coo, but we do.
How often do you see a pregnant woman on stage?
Young Vic 2019: plenty to get excited for by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Young Vic 2019: plenty to get excited for
As Rufus Norris has discovered at the National Theatre, taking over as Artistic Director from a regime that has been seen as a huge success is not always a bowl of cherries. Mostly what audiences and critics want is more of the same.
Ducking the truth by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Ducking the truth
"One of the beauties of Icke’s production is its ability to continually deceive and then flaunt the truth in front of us"
Liberating Shakespeare from a culture of awed reverence by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Liberating Shakespeare from a culture of awed reverence
Nobody would dispute that it is an honour to be the theatre culture that produced the playwright who many agree is the greatest that the world has ever seen. But it can also be a bit of a burden.
Why I joined Stagedoor by Lyn Gardner cover photo
Why I joined Stagedoor
Some claim that theatre criticism is in crisis but I reckon it is simply changing in response to the disruptions of recent years.