The Death Of A Black Man

The Death Of A Black Man

Alfred Fagon’s darkly compelling drama

Overview

It’s 1973 and the West Indies have spectacularly beaten England at their own game, in their own backyard.

Shakie, an 18-year old super-savvy wheeler-dealer, is in his element – and not just because of the cricket. Life is good: his furniture business is making serious money and he owns a flat on the King’s Road, the epicentre of everything that’s cool. Moreover, his best friend Stumpie has come up with a plan to crack the booming music industry together - the possibilities are endless so when Shakie’s ex-lover Jackie arrives at the Chelsea flat, the trio toast the future.

The champagne is flowing and ambition is running sky high - but how far will they go, and who will they sacrifice, in their quest to be rich beyond their wildest dreams?

The Death of a Black Man received its world premiere at Hampstead in 1975. 46 years on, Alfred Fagon’s darkly compelling drama, with its witty and complex characters, remains compulsive viewing today.

Alfred Fagon was a soldier, boxing champion, a welder, actor, poet and playwright. The leading theatre award for Black British writers is named in his honour: alfredfagonaward.co.uk

Dawn Walton was the Founder Artistic Director of Eclipse Theatre and makes her Hampstead Theatre debut. Her most recent productions include The Gift (Theatre Royal Stratford East), Red Dust Road (NT Scotland) and Black Men Walking (Royal Court).

Critic reviews

A frustrating museum piece

The Times

Fagon is a great wordsmith

Broadway World

This is an expert at work, and it’s a marvel to experience

A Younger Theatre

Uncomfortable truths beneath the poisoned patter in revival of Alfred Fagon's 1975 play

The Arts Desk

Mert Dilek writes on Dawn Walton’s revival of Alfred Fagon’s incendiary play, ‘a crucible in which questions of race, class, and gender intermingle’.

Exeunt

Less a drama than a free-flowing debate

The Telegraph

Expansive but cumbersome revival

The Stage

Just as relevant today as when the play premiered

London Theatre

Alfred Fagon's play makes a triumphant return to Hampstead 46 years on from its debut

WhatsOnStage

A funny and provocative revival

The Independent

Incendiary, if somewhat dated

Evening Standard

An inflammatory study of social mobility

The Guardian

Date & time

Show ended
Fri 28 May - Wed 30 Jun 2021
2.30pm & 7.30pm

Venue

Eton Avenue, Swiss Cottage NW3 3EU London, UK · Get Directions
2
out of 5 stars
2 user reviews
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