For Black Boys Who Have Considered Suicide When The Hue Gets Too Heavy photo on Stagedoor

For Black Boys Who Have Considered Suicide When The Hue Gets Too Heavy Tickets

The Royal Court Theatre, Nouveau Riche and New Diorama Theatre production transfers to the Apollo Theatre in London’s West End for a limited run

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Date & Time

Opening 25 Mar

Sat 25 Mar - Sun 7 May 2023, 2pm, 2.30pm, 7pm & 7.30pm

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Recommended By

You will almost certainly know Nouveau Riche for Queens of Sheba and Ryan Calais Cameron’s hard-hitting Typical, about the death of a black man in custody. Now the company turns its attention to black male mental health and the struggle to survive. This work takes its title from Notozake Shange’s 1976 theatrical choreopoem For Coloured Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf, about a group of unnamed people whose voices tell of bittersweet experiences as black women. Like Shange’s play, this new piece uses monologue and movement, poetry and music to speak of lived experience, the beautiful and the brutal.

About For Black Boys Who Have Considered Suicide When The Hue Gets Too Heavy

Inspired by Ntozake Shange’s seminal work For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide / When the Rainbow Is Enuf. For Black Boys Who Have Considered Suicide When The Hue Gets Too Heavy is located on the threshold of joyful fantasy and brutal reality: a world of music, movement, storytelling and verse – where six men clash and connect in a desperate bid for survival. Father figures and fashion tips. Lost loves and jollof rice. African empires and illicit sex. Good days and bad days. Six young Black men meet for group therapy, and let their hearts – and imaginations – run wild. The play was originally conceived by Ryan Calais Cameron in the wake of the killing of Trayvon Martin in 2013 and has been developed over the course of the last decade with young black men and mental health groups. Over 100 men auditioned for the production in 2021 which sold out both its initial run and subsequent transfer to the Royal Court Theatre, with returns queues at both venues every night. The full original cast return for this new production, directed by Ryan Calais Cameron. The cast, who collectively won the best performer in a play category at The Stage Debut Awards in 2022 and will be making their West End debuts, includes: Mark Akintimehin, Emmanuel Akwafo, Nnabiko Ejimofor, Darragh Hand, Aruna Jalloh and Kaine Lawrence.  Age Recommendation: 15+ Please note: This production contains themes that are likely to be upsetting including suicide, racism, racial slurs, and themes of violence, death and bereavement.